4 more easy steps to getting your videos online

In a previous post looking at 4 easy steps to getting your videos online, I looked at 4 of the major players in the online video sharing market – YouTube, Google Video, Metacafe and Soapbox. In this post I’m going to look at some other sites that I missed out, and try to spend less time on the sign-up process. Unlike the previous sites, most of these sites are not general video sharing sites, but a mixture of an attempt to create custom “channels” where a user can create an online presence with a series of videos or episodes, or social networking sites, with video at their core.

Revver, Blip, Brightcove, MyHeavy and Vimeo have all been mentioned to me as alternatives, so let’s spend some time taking a look.

Step 1: Find your video

For ease of comparison I once again chose the short (13 seconds, 3.5MB) video of the Amalfi Coast, between Positano and Amalfi.


Step 2: Create an account

Revver
What initially seemed easy, turned out to be a little less straightforward. Because of the revenue sharing opportunities that Revver are developing there was a fair bit more information they needed from you, such as paypal information, agreement to various distribution options, and your address. There were further optional questions too. I would prefer they asked me those questions later.

5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars

Blip TV
Incredibly easy and took less than 10 seconds.

5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars

Brightcove
A relatively lengthly sign-up process, requiring an address and phone number.

5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars

MyHeavy
Easy, with optional entries for your cellphone or Instant Messenger ID for future updates.

5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars

Vimeo
They say sign up only takes 10 seconds, but they’re wrong. It takes about 8. Nice and easy.

5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars

Step 3: Upload the video

Revver
Using a flash based interface this gave a nice progress indicator. I was unsure if I could leave to browse around the site, so I tried it and although I lost the progress indicator it soon appeared in my dashboard. [Incidentally, I really liked the dashboard on Revver, which shows your earnings, message inbox and so on]. Adding the usual title, description and keywords, there was also a selection for audience using the American ratings classification, PG-13, NC-17 etc. Revver then makes you wait in order for their Video Patrol team to review the video.

5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars

Blip TV
A nice visual editor for the description box made a nice change, with the ability to add images and HTML if you wish. You could also upload your own thumbnail image, choose a copyright license, content rating (bespoke), and some optional fields regarding distribution. Despite all the options I found it to be simple and intuitive. Uploading once again gives a progress bar, with an indication of transfer rate. It also suggests some other features of the site, which for a newbie was quite interesting (such as the ability to upload via FTP and directly from Windows Movie Maker) but I doubt of much use for a regular user. However after clicking on one of these I then hit a problem – where was the video I uploaded? Honestly I couldn’t find it, it seems that navigating away from the page interrupts the upload. I ended up re-uploading the same video, waiting until it had been uploaded and then using the options I was then presented with.

5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars

Brightcove
Brightcove is more of a corporate solution where branding and photos (as well as videos) can be uploaded, called “Assets”. Like vPod, Brightcove attempts to enable businesses and individuals to create their own personal TV channels. Upload requires either a Quick Upload plugin or a separate piece of software called Publishpod, which is quite odd as they whole site is Flash based and an uploader could have easily been built in. Videos have to already be in Flash format, or Windows Media Video for Pay Media downloads. As this meant that I could no longer compare this site to other sites, I didn’t upload the video and didn’t continue with Brightcove. Not rated.

[Update: I received the following info in an email from Brightcove: “…the Publishpod can be used to both encode videos from various formats into Flash and upload files to your account. Only the Quick Upload plugin requires the videos to be previously encoded.” However the Publishpod still requires a separate download and install which no other site requires.]

MyHeavy
This was as easy as any of the other sites, although I was forced to select a category which, although may fit with the overall themes of the site, none of them fit with my test video. A pop-up window shows the progress of the upload, allowing you to continue to use the site and upload another video if you want. Closing the window aborts the upload. Nice and simple.

5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars

Vimeo
Very simple like the others, a progress bar informs you of the, er, progress. Vimeo has a weekly limit of 30MBs for videos which may be too constraining for a lot of people. A nice big “watch it” link appears to avoid confusion. The video appears in it’s native format to begin with (.avi through Windows Media Player), but is converted to flash in the background.

5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars

Step 4: View the video

5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars

http://cache.myheavy.com/ve/flvplayer
MyHeavy Video Embedded
Pretty poor quality but comparable to others

5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars


Vimeo Video Embedded
Quality low but like the others
5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars5 stars

Overall

Revver
Pros: Nice interface. Probably the best video quality in this test.
Cons: A long wait to see video online, although may have been due to uploading problems.

Blip TV
Pros: Integrated video blogging platform, choice of video formats.
Cons: A few too many options and no warning on interrupting uploads so a person with a small brain like me has problems.

MyHeavy
Pros: Fast Flash interface, plenty of options.
Cons: Less of a video sharing site and more of a social networking site. Low video quality.

Vimeo
Pros: Quick to join, easy to upload and available immediately.
Cons: Low video quality – arguably worse than MyHeavy.


Final thoughts

Go here for a comparison of the video quality of all 8 video sharing sites from this article and the previous article.

Video quality was overall much poorer that the 4 big sites. Several sites took too long to process/approve the video. Previously Metacafe users decided not to approve my video (I got an email to say it was too boring, I must have missed that in the t&c’s….), and although that was later rectified I wonder whether reviewing solutions like this are scaleable if a site gets truly popular? Blip did a nice job of trying to integrate video publishing, blogging and various other tools such as del.ico.us and Flickr. Their video was available immediately (after I figured out the upload “problem”), in flash format or the original source (.avi) and in the latter the quality was the same as source (which I imagine it should be!). MyHeavy attempts to be more of a social networking site and to some degree succeeds, although I’m no expert.

All the sites had some small niggle with them (such as the adding of keywords where there seems to be no standard for how to enter these – do you separate them with a space or a comma? Use quotation marks for phrases? Are you allowed 3, 5 or unlimited keywords?), but these are probably personal and subjective.

Other sites such as Eyespot and Daily Motion confirms that at the moment there seems no stopping the rise of online video sharing sites, there is a wealth to choose from. Which one to choose is probably based on what you need it for. YouTube is the most popular (and will probably stay so with the merge with Google Video), but also one with the most “competition”. Revver and Metacafe allow you to share revenue if that is what you want, MyHeavy and Blip are more integrated social networking sites, and Soapbox has the highest video quality (in my opinion), but is only a small marketplace at the moment. Please, let me know your thoughts.

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12 thoughts on “4 more easy steps to getting your videos online

  1. Hi Joel,

    Thanks for the great review. Just a point of clarification – the additional information you entered during the signup process is optional and only required for any payouts you earn from creating or sharing videos. In the coming weeks you’ll see a design refresh demonstrating just how easy signing up for Revver truly is – and that will make the 10 second registration process look like a lifetime. 🙂

    Some of the other things that makes Revver great:

    1. Video quality. None of the other sites compete with our Flash or Quicktime (Quicktime’s always going to beat Flash) video quality, and for good reason. We’ve invested a lot more into high quality Flash transcoding than any of the video sites out there – including the big 4. Put our video side by side with the Youtube version and you’ll see there’s no comparison.

    2. Open API. Revver is the only service you can use to build a full UGC video portal out of the box. We’ve developed the entire revver.com site on our API – “eating our own dogfood” if you will. This means that anything we can do, you can do with our API. You can build a full video portal without ever even setting up a database. For more information, visit http://developer.revver.com/api.

    3. Creator Friendly. Our company was founded with the strong desire to serve creators and offer them a way to make a living doing the thing they loved doing. To this end, there’s never a business decision made without the question asked of how creators (and sharers) will be rewarded. Even as we explore alternate distribution methods (http://blog.revver.com/?p=344) you’ll see we always ensure the creator is rewarded for their work.

    4. Promoting Sharing. We don’t want to be a video portal, we want your video and your experience to be your own. Use the API, use the fully customizable JavaScript widget (http://developer.revver.com/widget/ ; example: ifp.org/video or 3 examples on lonelygirl15.com), use RSS feeds, to build your own brand. You earn 20% of the ad revenue just for sharing clips. For popular clips, that easily gets into the thousands of dollars for high trafficked sites.

    I hope this clarifies some of the finer points of Revver. We’re always eager to improve the Revver experience, so any feedback or suggestions are always welcome, just stop by the blog, the forum, or contact us and let us know how we can help. 🙂

    Asi Behar
    Director, Web Services & Experience
    Revver Inc.

    Like

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