Echo Paper – Recycled Paper Review

Echo Paper sells 100% post-consumer waste recycled paper, in a variety of formats.

The paper is certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) and the Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI). Their paper is also 100% process chlorine free and acid-free archival paper that will not yellow over time.

So why use recycled paper? Using 100% post-consumer waste recycled paper results in:

  • 45% less energy use
  • 38% less greenhouse gasses produced
  • 45% less wastewater generated
  • 50% less solid waste created
  • 100% less wood use

In fact, using 20 cases of Envirographic 100 paper that is made with 100% post-consumer waste rather than non-recycled paper saves the following resources:

  • 2 tons of wood used (approximately 13 trees)
  • 4,700 gallons of water (273 eight-minute showers)
  • 9 million btu of energy (enough energy to power an average American household for 37 days)
  • 548 pounds of solid waste (18.5 thirty-two gallon garbage cans)
  • 1,039 pounds of greenhouse gases (equivalent of carbon sequestered by about 13 tree seedlings grown for ten years)

Also Echo Paper plants a tree for every case sold, in partnership with Trees for the Future.

Now if I could just find out why paper in the US is three hole punched and in the UK two or four holes and a slightly different size….

One thought on “Echo Paper – Recycled Paper Review

  1. I think apart from doing something great in using recycled paper the fact that “Also Echo Paper plants a tree for every case sold, in partnership with Trees for the Future.” is a magnificent concept. Go Green!

    Like

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